Photography business

How To Easily Set Your Photography Price List in 2021

Determining a feasible pricing structure is one of the most daunting tasks a new photography entrepreneur faces. There’s not a magic formula when deciding how much to charge for your work, but there are some helpful guidelines you can follow.

Pricing strategies

The proliferation of digital media has made it much harder for photographers to charge for prints in the traditional way. So rather than adopt a “nickel and dime” pricing strategy where you charge for each print of an image (or photo shoot, proofs, photo album, and/or prints), consider charging only for what clients really value — your ability to capture moments.

One way you can capitalize on that is by offering specials on your social media

accounts. For example, many family photographers offer “mini-sessions” themed to various holidays or times of year via their social media channels. Sign-up is available to social followers only, and the price is a set one — usually a basic sitting fee for a small package of photos.

A photographer’s estimate is usually based on two elements: creative fees and expenses. On the creative side, you need to think about the quality of the image and what value you place on it. Photographer Jerry Clement says his formula for gallery prints includes the cost of production and what he calls an “intrinsic, artistic value,” with some profit margin on top of that. “You also have to take into account the gallery’s commission,” Clement says, “which usually averages 30 to 40 percent.”

You might also want to charge a sitting fee when working with clients. The sitting fee should cover your time as the photographer, editing of images, and, if you offer one, an online gallery of the client’s photos they can share with family and friends.

As part of your fees, factor in labor, supplies, and materials. Will the images be shot on location or in a studio? If you’re operating a studio, take a long, hard look at your local competitors to see what they’re charging for similar services, then start your pricing somewhere in the middle.

Wedding, portrait, and event photographers have an easier time scoping out the competition because it’s easy to stop by and pick up a price list and other information from competitors or simply visit their respective websites. Although it’s simple enough to pick up the phone and call a commercial photographer about their fees, it’s highly unlikely you’ll get a standard rate because fees are usually developed on a project-by-project basis. To cover yourself, be sure to pad your fee a bit to include unexpected issues.

Location shoots are more complex and involve considerations like site logistics, travel, special equipment, lighting equipment, props and additional personnel (e.g., models, assistants, technicians). In addition to the complexity of the project, you also need to consider the number of finished images needed, scheduling and pre- and post-production time.

Pre-production responsibilities may include client meetings, site location and/or visits, and set arrangements. After the shoot is over, post-production tasks may consist of restoring a site to its original state, returning props and equipment, and more client meetings — along with image editing, selecting, and finalizing the images.

Many commercial or location photographers charge day or half-day rates, with fees adjusted to weekly for long-term shoots or hourly for shorter projects. Don’t forget to add overtime (hourly rate plus 50 percent) for days that go longer than eight hours or for weekend assignments.

Whenever in doubt, use the industry standards found through different photography associations and organizations, like American Society for Media Photographers (ASMP) or Professional Photographers of America (PPA). Local chapters have monthly meetings where members can network and learn a wealth of information, including local marketing and industry standards.

Expenses

The other part of the pricing equation is expenses. Many photographers — especially in the beginning — try to absorb minor expenses, like supplies, postage and basic camera gear. But these little things quickly add up and chip away at your profits. Your fee structure should cover these incidentals. For example, if you decide $50 is a fair hourly rate, charge $75. Then use the hourly charge to calculate daily and weekly rates.

Overhead should also be a calculated expense that includes rent, utilities, insurance, gas, mileage, and anything else that you’re not billing clients separately for. Big ticket expenses for individual assignments, like travel, equipment, or personnel, should be billed separately, depending on your — or the client’s — preferences.

And don’t forget to include your own salary in your cost of doing business — if you do, then you’ve made a grave business error. Pay yourself first, then consider the rest of your costs as overhead. Ultimately, if your business can’t cover its payroll and expenses, you’ll need to charge more for your work, find other ways to increase revenue and/or cut costs.

After factoring your costs into your pricing structure, find ways to reduce those costs and increase profits. Monitor your progress each month by using profit and loss reports, which your bookkeeping or accounting software should allow you to generate with ease if you’re using it correctly.

If you want to become successful and grow your business, you’re going to have to handle tasks you don’t like, including bookkeeping and accounting. Many photographers think of themselves as “creative types” who don’t deal with numbers. However, if you don’t understand the finances related to your business and maintain proper records using accounting or bookkeeping software, you’ll quickly find yourself in financial crisis.

Photography tips

Soft Proofing: Cut Your Editing Time in Half!

Stop over-editing. Start soft proofing!

From a purely technical standpoint, soft proofing is all about color management and getting your on-screen photos to match the prints you get from your pro lab. 

For photographers, however, there’s an earlier step in the soft proofing process, and it’s all about your clients.

“Soft proofing means allowing your clients to choose the images that they’d like fully edited from a gallery of proofs,” explains family photographer Stefanie Cole.

“Depending on your style of editing, the proofs can be SOOC (straight out of camera) or given a quick, preliminary edit,” Stefanie suggests. “My packages come with a set number of digitals, so soft proofing allows them to choose their purchased images while also giving them the option to buy more.”Portrait of a couple by a lake. Portrait of a baby in a basket.

Here’s why clients love soft proofing:

Soft proofing allows Stefanie’s clients see more of their images faster. They don’t have to wait for every image to be edited to perfect, and they’re never left wondering if a “better” photo was excluded from their gallery. “They feel more in control of the images that they receive,” says Stefanie, “and are happier as a result.”

But soft proofing isn’t only great for clients.

“I never edit a photo that I haven’t been paid for!” Stefanie shares. “It has sped up my workflow drastically, and it’s taken a lot of the difficult choices out of culling.”

Soft proofing in 5 steps

These are the steps Stefanie follows to create a streamlined, inclusive ordering process for her clients:

#1: Add your images to Lightroom and cull

  • Add the session’s photos to a Lightroom catalog
  • Tap “P” to “Pick” your keepers
  • You can also tap “X” to “Reject” a photo you don’t want to show
  • Or tap numbers 1-5 to give each image a star rating

Stefanie admits that culling is a bit of a balancing act. Show too few images, and your clients may wonder, “Where are the rest?” Show too many, and they may become overwhelmed, which can result in smaller purchases.

#2: Apply your preset

You may choose to soft proof with photos that are SOOC, but Stefanie finds it beneficial to perform a light edit on the photos she’ll show.

“I don’t worry about proofs being perfect,” she clarifies, “but if any are drastically off-center or need cropping, I will do that. If any head swaps are necessary, I’ll go ahead and do that, too, but that’s rare.”

#3: Edit a few favorites

  • Choose 1-3 favorites from the shoot
  • Give those picks your full post-production treatment
  • Share these to social media (with your client’s permission, of course!)

These fully-edited favorites help Stefanie’s clients to envision what their finished products will look like.

#ShootProofPRO Tip: Final edits

The way your photographs appear to your clients is largely dependent upon their computer monitor, color profile and display options, and (if they’re trying to make their own prints) their printer profile. This is why it’s important for your final output to be created with print quality in mind.

An accurate soft proof is one that looks phenomenal when printed by your preferred professional lab. Make sure your clients know that you can only guarantee the print quality of photographs ordered directly through you.

#4: Export the soft proofs

Stefanie exports her soft proofs into a client folder on her desktop, then uploads those images into a ShootProof gallery.

“Once uploaded, be sure to turn the download feature OFF,” reminds Stefanie, “and add a nice, big watermark that is vivid enough that people won’t screenshot your work, but transparent enough that they can clearly see their faces in the images.”

Photography tips

Photography Tip: The difference between fixed and variable aperture

Variable aperture comes into play if you have a zoom lens. If your lens has two numbers, i.e., F/3.5 to F/5.6, you have what’s called a variable aperture lens. This means your widest aperture (lower number) is different at different focal lengths.

The variable aperture allows the camera manufacturer to make the lens for less money. These lenses are often smaller and lighter than their fixed aperture counterparts.

Constant aperture lenses are heavier and require more sophisticated glass, which costs more money. They are generally of higher quality than variable aperture lenses.

The aperture functions independently of the lens focal length on a fixed aperture lens. Another advantage of fixed aperture lenses is that typically, their lens barrel doesn’t extend or retract when the focal length changes. This means they don’t get physically longer when you zoom.

Should you buy fixed or variable aperture glass? It depends on how serious you are about your photography, what your goals are and how skilled you are.

Most beginners, casual amateurs and snap shooters will never need the fixed aperture zooms. And all zooms made within the last five years are significantly better than the zoom lenses (even the expensive ones) I used in the 70s and early 80s.

Variable aperture lenses

Lenses with variable apertures mean that the aperture changes based on your focal length. On my 18-55mm lens, I could achieve a f/3.5 aperture when zoomed all the way out to 18mm. When I zoomed in to 55mm, the widest aperture available was f/5.6.

These lenses are typically lighter and are great travel options. They’re also great because they’re much more cost-effective.

The downside here is the limitation of aperture choices, which affects not only depth-of-field but the range of exposure choices as well. If I’m photographing an event with a variable aperture lens, it means that each time I zoom to bring the subject closer, I lose light, because the front element of my lens’ isn’t big enough to let in more light. If I photograph an event outside this gets even more challenging, especially with clouds changing the light source on a constant basis. Long story short, it can be more difficult to control your exposure with a variable aperture lens.

Outside of exposure, variable aperture lenses allow camera manufacturers to produce lenses for a lot less money. They pass these savings on to the consumer, resulting in a lower-priced, and quite often an inferior quality lens.

Fixed aperture lenses

The opposite is true of fixed aperture lenses. These lenses are heavier in comparison to their variable aperture brethren. These lenses come with some serious glass and mechanics packed inside. Of course, this leads to higher-priced lenses, but the benefits are manyfold.

With a fixed aperture lens, the aperture functions independently from the focal length of the lens. Meaning, whether you’re zooming in or not, your aperture stays constant until you adjust it either within your camera. Remember that event I was photographing? I can photograph someone right next to me, or 50 feet away, and get the same exposure levels. My aperture won’t change automatically when the focal length increases to bring the subject closer — instead, I’ll have complete control over it, no matter if it’s set at a wider angle or full telephoto.

So what’s best?

If you’re talking mechanics and technology, fixed focal length lenses will provide a sharper photograph. But they’re much more expensive. They are heavier, making them more difficult to travel with or carry around for long periods of time.

There’s no globally best option here — it’s really what’s best for your situation. If you photograph in a lot of dark environments, being able to open your aperture to f/2.8 or better is most definitely a benefit. That fixed aperture will come in handy. Likewise, if you’re trying to narrow down your travel kit to one body and one or two lenses, a variable aperture lens might give you an option that can let you capture a wide array of situations. Remember, most kit lenses are cost and quality cutters. There are good variable aperture alternatives even though they do cost more.

For guidance or more information, please contact us.

 
 
Photography gadgets

Incredibly Useful Photography Gadgets

Photographers love their gadgets, and gadgets are fantastic go-to’s when the gift-giving season rolls around. There’s certainly no shortage of toys on the market, but it’s overwhelming figuring out what’s worth the buy. If the photographer in your life hasn’t provided you with a wish list, it feels like a shot in the dark trying to pick out what they need. This might help. Here are key photography accessories that make for awesome gifts.

White-Balancing Tools

Most digital cameras have an Auto White Balance function that works in a pinch. But, for many pros and serious hobbyists, it’s preferable to customize WB right on the spot. Impact’s QuikBalance Collapsible 12″ Gray Panel, a modern twist on the classic gray card, is one way to do this. One side is 18% gray, and the other is neutral white. When placed in the same lighting as the subject, photographers can adjust their settings accordingly or use it as a base point for accurate post-processing later. The same concept applies to the X-Rite Original ColorChecker Card, which features 24 colors that mimic things they might be shooting (skin tones, sky, foliage, etc.) as well as neutral grays.

Replacement Camera Straps

The neck straps that come with bigger cameras typically aren’t designed for comfort. On longer shots, they can become downright painful. The best way to avoid strain is to get the camera off the neck altogether, and these several fantastic alternatives can do just that. Black straps are designed to be worn from shoulder to hip, distributing weight evenly across the body. They come in a range of designs, depending on how much or what type of support is needed. Peak Design also has a great line of versatile straps that can be worn around the neck or across the shoulder, along with a quick-connecting handgrip and tethered wrist cuff (great for lighter cameras). Hand straps are also available from Vello, who sells some great little padded attachments that can be used with or without battery grips. To go hands-free altogether, hip holsters are lifesavers. Spider is famous for its heavy-duty SpiderPro Single and Dual holster systems, and its smaller Black Widow for lightweight DSLRs. 

Memory-Card Wallets

A memory-card wallet is a downright necessary organizational tool for any photographer. Memory cards are small and delicate, a bad combination without somewhere safe to keep them. Check out the colorful little SD Pixel Pocket Rocket from ThinkTank. This wallet will hold 9 SD cards in clear slots, along with a few business cards in the back. It folds up nice and flat so it hardly takes up any room. For a more protective way to store cards, Pelican offers some great hardcover cases made of polycarbonate resin. These are water-resistant and shock absorbent, so they’ll gladly take a beating. The 0915 is perfect for SD or Mini SD cards, while the 0945 is designed for CF cards.

Camera Bag

A good camera bag is a necessity. It will be heavily used, so put some thought into what’ll serve someone best. Lowepro is a good place to start, since the company offers just about any style of carrying case a person could need. Sleek black shoulder bags are available in a range of sizes, each with padded interiors and retractable rain flaps. Lowepro also offers similarly-built backpacks, which come in assorted colors and are well suited to the mobile photographer. If you’re looking for something that offers style as well a protection

Tripod

Every photographer needs a tripod. Whether you decide to shell out a lot or a little, having something to safely stabilize a camera is a must-have for certain kinds of shots. The MeFOTO’s aluminum construction can support up to 26.4 lb of equipment. One of its key features is its portability: it collapses into a mere 16.1″, which is remarkably convenient for a tripod of its size. But if that’s still too big, the flexible little Joby Gorillapod is a perfect mini-tripod to stabilize up to 6.6 lb of camera. Its bendy joints can be flexed to grip or wrap around almost any object.

Filters

Filters can be somewhat underrated these days, but they definitely serve a purpose, even in the age of digital photography. Warming or cooling filters can be used for adjusting color temperatures, and a multitude of specialty filters can be used to achieve different creative effects. For landscape photographers, two of the most beloved types of filters are neutral density and circular polarizers. ND filters come solid, graduated, or center-weighted, and cut the light entering a lens by several stops. These are great for long-exposure shots, letting the photographer dictate the shutter speed and aperture without worrying about overexposing in bright ambient light. Circular polarizers work by changing the way lenses takes in light. They eliminate reflections and glare (water, glass, etc.), as well as darken blue skies for rich, gorgeous color.

Memory Card Reader

High-volume photographers need a way to quickly and efficiently get their digital images uploaded to a computer. The best way to do this is with a memory card reader, and the Lexar Professional USB 3.0 Dual-Slot device is perfectly cut out for the job. This portable reader is compatible with CF, SDXC/ SDHC UHS-I, and SD cards, and is fully capable of simultaneous transfer. Its pop-up design protects inner circuitry when not in use, and it’s compatible with both USB 3.0 and 2.0 ports.

What is a go to gadget you recommend photographers think about picking up for their travels, studios, or just to have around the house? Let me know in the comments below!

Wedding photography business

How to Start a Wedding Photography Business In Pakistan

As it is all the more a known fact that with the passage of time the demand and popularity of the photo shoot business is getting high in success and popularity! Almost each single wants to know that how you can easily get on with the starting of the business on the easiest terms that is related with the photo shoot.

Well, when establishing the photoshoot business, there are so many minor and major things that you do need to keep in mind. You should know that whether you want to start the business from home or from the assistance of the team members. This is an important question to learn it all through!

Right below we will be explaining out with some of the important guidelines which you should be discussing around when it comes to the start up of the photography wedding business in Pakistan.

Types of Services You Will Offer

You should know the varied types of the services that are to be given away in the wedding photography business. Almost all the business sectors and so as the individuals are always in want to get the photographer services as meant best for so many of the reasons. Business sectors do want to take the services of the photographers just for the purpose of promotion of their products for the side of the brochures. Most of the time realtors also take the services of the photographers too as where they can find it easy to sell their homes.

Create a Business Plan

In the next step, you should be heading on with the creation of the business plan to bring the development aspects in it. You should be adding the business plan with the features of the services you are offering, details about your business and financial aspects too. You should be highlighting your mission and vision too. You should not be missing out giving a quick timeline details about the pricing structure as well. This is an important thing to look out for!

Create an Attractive Business Name

Now it’s time to give a name to your business! Always remember that your brand name is very much important in order to make your business identified inside the marketplaces.  You should be setting it with something that is really inspiring and should be targeting the audience too.

Start Establishing your Business Officially

In the next step it’s time when you should be thinking about giving your business with the establishment of being official on terms. As you are all set with the name of the business and so as its settings, you should obtain business license or permits as required by your city or county. You should be clear much in giving your brand name with the legal registration inside the marketplaces.

So, these have been few of the important and main points which you probably do need to keep in mind when it comes to the successful establishment of the photography business in Pakistan.

Follow the guidelines carefully! All the Best!

Photo Manipulation Ideas (for Beautiful Results)

If you’re looking for some fun photo manipulation ideas to create stunning art, you’ve come to the right place.

Today, manipulating digital photography is a quick and easy process. Want to generate a double-exposure look? Create a tilt-shift effect? Simulate a fisheye lens? All these options and more are accessible thanks to image manipulation programs like Photoshop.

So here are some photo manipulation ideas to get your creative juices flowing!

1. Make a tilt-shift effect

When viewing a landscape from a distance, the scene looks uniformly focused to our eyes. However, when we look at a fake or model landscape, our physical proximity to the miniature scene creates some interesting optical effects.

But you don’t need a fake landscape to create this “tilt-shift” effect. With the right lenses, you can achieve it in-camera – or you can replicate the phenomenon in post-processing!

2. Generate an anaglyph 3D effect

Anaglyph 3D renderings are made up of two differently filtered and slightly offset colored images. When viewed through special glasses, the two different colors are seen by different eyes, creating a 3D effect.

Creating an anaglyph 3D image in Photoshop is easy. First, open a photo and duplicate the Background layer twice. Select one of the duplicated layers and click on the FX icon at the bottom of the Layers panel. Select Blending Options – this will open the Layer Style window. Uncheck the G and B checkboxes next to Channels in the central panel. Then click OK.

3. Imitate a circular fisheye lens

Photo manipulation ideas inspired by camera equipment can achieve engaging results. A fisheye lens is an ultra-wide-angle that produces a large amount of distortion, creating distinctive panoramic or hemispherical images.

To create a circular fisheye effect, open an image and select the Elliptical Marquee tool. Set the Style dropdown on the top menu to Fixed Ratio and drag the Marquee tool over the center of the image. Click Filter > Distort > Spherize. Adjust the amount of distortion you’d like in the pop-up panel (I usually leave the slider at 100%).

4. Combine two images for a double exposure effect

rom the days of early photography, shooters have gone to considerable lengths to avoid ghosting and double exposures. However, some photographers generate multiple exposures deliberately for creative purposes.

Double exposures can be made in-camera (both digitally and on film), but they can also be imitated in Photoshop.

5. Create a lens flare

When bright light reaches your camera, it can reflect off different parts of the lens to create an interesting flare effect.

While lens flare is sometimes unwanted, it can have interesting creative applications.

6. Create a sepia look with Photoshop

Sepia is a warm brown tone named after the pigment derived from the ink sac of the cuttlefish genus Sepia. In photography, the term sepia refers to a form of print toning. The use of sepia in photography began in the 1880s, and today the beautiful warmth of sepia toning is associated with age and history.

To apply a sepia tone to a photograph in Photoshop, first, open an image. Create a Curves adjustment layer and adjust the curve to introduce a faded aesthetic

Photo manipulation ideas: Conclusion

From Lomography-inspired effects to simulated glitch art, the creative possibilities of photography are just about limitless. So if you find yourself in a creative rut, give one of the photo manipulation ideas from this list a try – you never know what new perspectives your manipulations might inspire!

Photography tips

Photography Aspect Ratio: What Is It and Why Does It Matter?

What are aspect ratios in photography? How does an aspect ratio affect your images? And how can you change the aspect ratio once you’ve taken a photo?

In photography, aspect ratio represents the relationship between the width and the height of an image. It can be expressed as a number followed by a colon and followed by another number, such as 3:2, or by a decimal number such as 1.50 (which is simply the long side divided by the short side). Some even prefer to express aspect ratio as a decimal, followed by a colon and number 1, such as 1.50:1.

You can easily visualize any aspect ratio by allocating units to the width and the height of an image. For example, a 4:3 aspect ratio would consist of 4 equal size units for its width and 3 equal size units for its height. Similarly, an image with a 3:2 aspect ratio would be represented by 3 equal size units for its width vs 2 units for its height, as shown below:

4-3-Aspect-Ratio-vs-3-2

Why does aspect ratio matter?

Different aspect ratios will produce different types of compositions.

For instance, a square, 1:1 aspect ratio tends to produce very balanced, often confined images.

A 4:5 or a 3:2 aspect ratio offers a bit more space within the frame.

And a 16:9 aspect ratio gives a lot of room for expansion along the image edges.

Common camera aspect ratios

Virtually every camera sensor offers one of two aspect ratios:

3:2 aspect ratio

A 3:2 aspect ratio is used by 35mm crop-sensor and full-frame DSLRs, some Leica medium format cameras, most mirrorless cameras, high-end compact cameras, and most 35mm film cameras. This aspect ratio has been with us ever since Leica made the first 35mm film cameras in the early 20th century.

4:3 aspect ratio

The 4:3 aspect ratio is used by Micro Four Thirds cameras, many compact cameras, some medium format digital cameras, as well as medium format film cameras using the 6 cm x 4.5 cm format.

Why Aspect Ratio is Important

Understanding the fundamentals of aspect ratio is very important, because of the way it affects your final image. This can be especially critical at the time of physically capturing a photograph.

For example, if you capture an image with a camera in its native 4:3 aspect ratio and cram your subject or important elements of the scene to the edges of the frame, you might not be able to crop the image to wider aspect ratios.

Pro Tip

Need to crop to a certain paper size in Photoshop?

Just enter the size of your print as the ratio in the width and height boxes, just as you did in the example above (for example, 8.5:11).

canon camera price in pakistan

Best Canon gear of the year: fantastic cameras, lenses and flashguns from Canon

Everything just gets better in 2021! From budget-friendly beginners’ cameras, to exotic lenses, dazzling flash kits, tricked-up tripods and beyond, we’ve seen some fabulous gear from Canon this year. 

Looking for the best Canon camera? Canon has launched some stunning models in its photographic line-up. Other manufacturers including Benro, Elinchrom and Manfrotto, to name but a few, have also really impressed us.

Canon EOS M50

The Canon EOS M50 mirrorless system camera is compact and lightweight, and we love its retracting 15-45mm kit lens, which delivers excellent wide-angle potential. Despite its size, the M50 feels like a ‘proper’ camera, with its electronic viewfinder and sculpted finger grip. Around the back, the fully articulated ‘vari-angle’ touchscreen makes for slick and intuitive control. We’re also impressed that the 24MP Dual Pixel AF image sensor ensures rapid autofocus and great image quality.

Canon EOS 1500D with 18-55mm Lens

We like that the Canon EOS 1500D with 18-55mm Lens small and lightweight enough to take anywhere and everywhere and that it’s so simple to use. The vari-angle screen enables novel shooting angles, injecting fun into photography. 

And when we’re in a more serious shooting mood, the dual control dials and top-panel info LCD come to the fore, as featured on enthusiast-level cameras. 

Super specs include a Dual Pixel AF image sensor, 45-point autofocus system, a 5-axis sensor-shift stabilizer for movies, Wi-Fi, NFC and Bluetooth. We love having so much packed into such a small DSLR.

Canon EOS 6D Mark II 

Initial reaction to the Canon EOS 6D Mark II from some quarters suggested the tonal range and high-ISO noise suppression weren’t as good as from the original 6D, but there’s very little in it and the Mark II has 30% more megapixels under the bonnet. Advertisementhttps://677fe3ed51b5759dab891473293b0346.safeframe.googlesyndication.com/safeframe/1-0-38/html/container.html

Both autofocus systems are massively better, with phase-detection AF rising from 11 points (only one cross-type) to 45 points (all cross-type), while Dual Pixel AF makes for vastly improved autofocus in live view and movie capture. 

The latter also benefits from in-camera stabilization, while other improvements include a vari-angle touchscreen and a faster 6.5fps burst rate. All in all, it’s a fabulous camera and the EF 24-105mm IS STM kit lens is well worth having.

LENSES

Canon EF 35mm

The Canon EF 35mm has excellent image quality, compact and lightweight built, and the inclusion of image stabilization makes it a top choice for street photography when using a full-frame. The same combo of highlights also makes it a superb ‘standard prime’ for APS-C format DSLRs, on which it has an effective focal length of 56mm. This gives a very natural viewing perspective, compared with the more wide-angle view that it delivers on a full-frame camera.

Canon EF 70-200mm F/2.8L IS II USM Lens

The Mark II edition of this lens has been the go-to telephoto for top professional photographers around the world, since 2010. It’s so good that the brand new Canon EF 70-200mm f/2.8L IS III USM adds very little. Unlike Canon’s new 70-200mm f/4L IS II USM, there are no improvements in the autofocus and stabilization systems, and the glass remains essentially the same. The key upgrade is that a high-tech ASC (Air Sphere Coating) is applied to the 19th element in the optical path, which further reduces ghosting and flare. Fluorine coatings are also added to the front and rear elements, to repel moisture and grease. It’s still the best Canon-fit 70-200mm lens on the market, and now it’s just a little better.

FLASHGUNS

Canon Speedlite 320EX

Canon Speedlite 320EX II is a versatile flash that includes an LED light on the front that can be used as a modeling light, an AF assist beam during Live View shooting, or to light up nearby subjects in low light for video recording. It will provide up to 4 hours of continuous lighting with fully-charged AA batteries. The 320EX is E-TTL- and E-TTL II-compatible using Type-A EOS cameras, and it has a guide number of 78.7?/24m @100 ISO at 24mm.

Canon Macro Twin Lite MT-26EX-RT

For close-up shooting with a macro lens, a regular flashgun can yield awful results with harsh shadows. This revamped and rejuvenated ‘Macro Twin Lite’ solves the problem. The control unit slots into the hotshoe of a camera, and the two miniature flash heads clip onto a mounting ring that attaches to the front of most Canon macro lenses. Adaptors are available for other lenses with filter threads of between 52mm and 72mm. We like that the redesigned control panel is more intuitive, and that the use of two independent flash heads enables wide-ranging close-up lighting techniques. It beats ring lights which give completely shadow-free results that can look flat and two-dimensional. We also love the high-intensity LED lamps which can be a real help when focusing.

For more details of Canon accessories or Canon camera price in Pakistan please contact us

Sony Cameras

The Best Sony Travel Cameras To Buy In 2021

Sony has one of the best mirrorless camera lineups out there and with the constant release of their new mirrorless cameras, the Alpha series that combines the professional functionality in a smaller compact body, each year, there are more options for you to choose from than ever before.

That said, with more options, comes the overwhelming feeling for you to pick the right Sony mirrorless camera that fits the type of travelers you are. That is why I decided to write this guide, to help you choose which Sony mirrorless cameras from the Alpha Series is perfect for you.

Why Choose Sony?

When you are buying a camera from a brand, you are also investing in its ecosystem by buying lenses and accessories and it can be very expensive if you want to switch from one ecosystem to another.

That is why picking the right brand to invest your money in is one of the hardest decisions you will have to make when you are buying a new camera. There are quite a few options out there but no brand has developed as fast as Sony when it comes to mirrorless technology.

Canon in Pakistan may be the #1 camera brand in the DSLR world, but no one can compete with Sony right now when it comes to mirrorless cameras as they have many years of experience developing and refining their cameras while Canon stuck to their guns until only recently where they caved in and released their mirrorless camera lineup.

When it comes to lens selection, Sony used to lack behind the others but not anymore. As Sony mirrorless cameras gained popularity worldwide, so is the lens selection with manufacturers like Sigma and Rokinon jumping on the bandwagon as well as the forever-expanding list of official lenses by GMaster and Zeiss that they created for the Sony E-Mount system.

All in all, if you are looking for a new mirrorless camera to buy, Sony is the way to go.

The Best Sony Camera For Extremely Light Travelers

If you are looking for an affordable yet advanced Sony mirrorless camera packed with features in a compact body, you can’t beat the Sony a6400. The Sony a6400, released in February 2019, comes with a 24.2mp APS-C cropped sensor, a new processor, a 4k video recording capability, extremely fast autofocus, a LOG picture profile system, and many more.

Even though the Sony a6600 is a better model, it is also 1,200 USD, almost 300 USD more than the Sony a6400. The Sony a6600 has the same sensor and processor as the a6400 but without the in-body stabilization which can be compensated with buying lenses that have already come equipped with optical stabilization.

Personally, I think the benefit you gain from getting the newer model is minimal and not worth the 300 USD more that you can spend on lenses instead.

The Best Sony Camera For Light Travelers And Enthusiasts

If you are looking for a compact camera that is as advanced as the Sony a7 III but in a compact size of the Sony a6400, Sony has just released a new camera that bridged the gap, the Sony a7C.

With the Sony a6400, you are getting a compact size but you are sacrificing the quality with a smaller APS-C sensor than what you get from the Sony a7 series. With the Sony a7C, you are getting the a7 series sensor but in a compact body of an APS-C camera, creating a camera that are the best of both worlds.

What do you think of the recommended cameras? Do you own one of these mirrorless cameras and have some experience or thoughts to share? If so, please do not hesitate to let us know in the comments below.

Photography ideas

Blast From the Past: 7 Photography Projects That Still Look Good Today

Everything moves at a fast pace in the digital era. What’s relevant today is forgotten tomorrow. Photography is no different. With so many photographers around, publications are constantly delivering new and exciting work to their audience. But as new work emerges, previous work doesn’t need to lose its value. 

Photography Projects

Before we get into the work, be aware that all the photography projects you see below have been previously featured on The Phoblographer. We’ve had countless submission over the past 11 years, so picking this list wasn’t easy. But we’re happy with the fantastic work we’re about to share with you. And we know you’ll be happy too!

1. Sarolta Ban’s Photography Project Raised Awareness for Animal Shelters

We published the work of Sarolta Ban way back in 2014. Based in Budapest, Ban created dreamlike images that offered the cuteness of animals and the important message of the cause. Ban sold her work in print, and $50 of every order she received went to an animal shelter. Great work for a wonderful cause – we were proud to be a part of it.

2. Luc Kordas Documents Hasidic Jews with His Photography Project

Luc Kordas‘ wonderful black and white street photography project caught our attention back in 2015. His work began three years before that. In 2012 he began focusing more on the Hasidic community. He told us, “…one day I arrived in Williamsburg and instead of turning left for the hipster part, I turned right to the Hasidic part because that seemed more interesting.” We love how real his work is. There’s no agenda, just pure documentation. Fantastic.

3. Argus Estabrook’s Photography Project Focuses on Hope

Looking at photographs made by Estabrook was like looking at poetry on a page. Sure, he tackles the struggles of life. But he portrays them with so much creativity that the viewer will become gripped by his message. Working out of South Korea, Estsabrook became close and intimate with the nation’s people. Often seen at protests and rallies, his images act as a voice for the millions who want to be heard.

4. Jorge Serra Experiments in a Unqiue Way

It was only a couple of years ago that we first published this work. But coming across it again made it feel it was worth another feature. Serra offers images that take light painting to a new level. They don’t feel cliche, but instead, they’re fresh and unique. He told us, “It started as a hobby that soon developed into a conceptualised way of approaching new things.” That hobby led to great things. The work shown above was part of an album cover for City Number Nine.

5. Maryline Rivard and Her Conceptual Portraits

Rivard creates majestic self-portraits. On her main motivation for the work, she told us, “I think it is important to show a certain vulnerability in a world where we constantly struggle to show that we are perfect, strong and powerful.” Her camera is certainly a mirror for the range of feelings and thoughts humans have about themselves. We really enjoyed spending time with Rivard’s work.

6. Nick Seyler Is Dedicated to Concert Photography

Seyler was only 21 years old when we featured him. Although so young, he offered a body of work that suggested he was a photographer well into his later years. A budding music and concert photographer, Seyler nails the art of documenting the excitement and chaos of the music scene. He told us his main motivation for his work isn’t money, “…I could probably count on my hands and feet the amount of times bands actually paid…” he says. Instead, he does it for his love of music and the community vibe that comes with it.

7. Daniel Schaefer Has Worked on Several Photography Projects

Schaefer was still in the early phases of developing his trade back in 2015. But even still, we became instantly attached to his style of portraiture. His frames offer a retro vibe. There’s no over-editing, and his subjects seem to reflect their authentic selves. Strong work, and we’re happy to see he’s still keeping active

For more information or guidance on this you can contact us.