Cityscape photography

Tips for Amazing Cityscape Photography

When we think of any city either New York or Paris, first their iconic cityscapes come to mind. There is no doubt in this that cityscape photography is so popular. The good part of this photography is that it is not so difficult. Subjects around a city will be clear and still. Find some amazing cityscape photography tips here.

Weather

Right weather results in stunning cityscape photography. Outdoor photography relies on the natural light available. Only natural light is not the only source but mist and Stormy skies can add to beautiful pictures. Weather will surely have an impact on cityscape photography.

Weather

Hands-Free Options

When capturing cityscape it is better to use a tripod and hands-free shutter releases both. These gadgets ensure sharper images and reduce handshakes. At some places you can’t use a tripod, there you can use a sock filled with rice as a portable stabilizer.

Capturing from Rooftop Bars

Usually, big cities have tall buildings and most of them have viewing platforms through which you can capture. But some places require planning. Rooftop bars are best if you can’t find any viewing platforms.

Adjust F-Stop and ISO for Sharp Images

There are some camera settings you want to adjust in cityscape photography.  Start with the aperture at f/8 and work your way up. This will give you sharp images. Also, keep your ISO as low as possible. Because higher the ISO, your image will get more noise. When the camera is handheld, keep your shutter speed at 1/125 s minimum.

Combine Framing Techniques

The subject should be in the frame and this composition rule creates a balanced image. Good results can be achieved by aiming at the horizon in your image or you can focus on a point of interest to capture uniquely. A mixture of techniques can be done for the best results.

Focus foreground

The foreground is an important component in cityscape photography. You just need to slight your camera up a little while placing it on the ground. Close-up shots from the ground give great results.

People in the frame

For best outcomes, try to include people in your frame, as this is the important subject moreover it helps in showing the scale of your city. Small figure running, walking, or jumping against large picture is an interesting contrasting element. In this way wall or building is better emphasized in the picture.

Reflections

Try to look for reflections in the image to add balanced symmetry and depth. Reflections can be better captured near bridges over bodies of water or waterfronts. Also, it can be shown in buildings, windows, and puddles also help create abstract images. This gives interesting effects in the picture.

Reflections

Shooting During Golden Hour and Blue Hour

Golden hour and blue hour is the best time to photograph a cityscape. Golden hour is the time after sunrise and before sunset, whereas blue hour is just after the sun goes down and can last anywhere between 5 to 40 minutes.

Golden hour

Wide Angle Lens

To shoot wider you need to capture from a wide-angle lens. This is important in landscape photography as you need to capture a lot in the frame. It shows the center of your image a bit far, so you might need to crop the image later.

 

For more guidance or any camera price in Pakistan, contact Golden Camera.

How to Do Panning Photography

Panning implies motion in your photography. Panning can be used to create a sense of motion in your images. It is not as tough as you might think. Here we have discussed some techniques to do this in the best way.

What Is Panning?

A technique that lets you capture pictures in motion is panning. This results in focus for the subject that has a motion-blurred background. Panning gives the image a feeling of movement and it even makes the image look almost speedy.

Panning photography

1. Good Stance Is the Key

A good position to capture is the key to creating a panning shot. Here we have shared simple tips to master the panning:

  1. Keep your posture stiff and stand straight
  2. No movement of feets
  3. Keep your middle finger lightly on the shutter button;
  4. Track your subject in the viewfinder
  5. Click the shutter as they cross in front of you

 

Subject Example Shutter Speed (s)
Slow Slow-moving things 1/4 to 1/15
Moderate Cars or bikes in street 1/15 to 1/30
Fast Fast-moving vehicles 1/60 to 1/125

Good stance2. Panning and Motion Blur

Adding motion blur to pictures’ background, and various shutter speeds will also affect the motion blur of your subject.

A shutter speed with slow effect will create motion blur on any moving part of the subject

Motion blur

3. Focus on the Subject Manually

After discussing a few techniques we will now come to the focus part. Most people want their subject focused and the background blurred. What if you want to keep your subject in focus?

Autofocus can work but that might not do the trick. That’s why you need to manually focus sometimes.

To get this right technique correct, you will need to follow these steps:

  • Guess the point where the motion might look best
  • Focus the camera manually on that point before your subject reaches that point.Focus

4. Continuous Shooting Mode

Modern cameras can shoot at six frames per second, if not more, using continuous shooting mode. With this, you can set your camera to continuous shooting mode when panning. Continuous mode lets you get the chance of getting an excellent image as well as a focused subject

Photography

5. Panning and Image Stabilization

Image stabilization (IS) does not work well when panning. That’s why image stabilization is specifically created to counteract vibrations and camera movements.

If your lens has an advanced image stabilization mode then you can use it for panning technique. Like, some Canon cameras have an IS mode 2, which has customized designing for the purpose of panning.

image stabilization

Final words:

We have explained tips for stunning photos in panning techniques to make you become a better photographer.

But the journey doesn’t stop here. There are more tricks, tips, and secrets- which will help you take great images.

For more details, you can contact Golden Camera.

Canon vs Nikon

Canon vs Nikon: who makes the best Mirrorless cameras in 2021?

Canon and Nikon: these two are the biggest names in photography world and are still going with close competition with new camera but the question is who is winning

A photographer changing settings on a Canon EOS 5D Entry level full frame mirrorless

Full frame mirrorless cameras are trendy in photography right now. Canon and Nikon offer intriguingly different entry-level cameras but there is no such competition between Nikon and Canon as there is no real Nikon competitor of Canon M200. This crop sensor entry-level mirrorless camera offers an ISO range from 100 to 25 600, 24 MP resolution, internal flash , and 6 fps continuous shooting.

There is another  Canon EOS RP camera which is designed to be simple, affordable, compact and and we especially consider its fully vari-angle rear screen.

 

It has technologies that cannot be found in previous DSLR cameras, such as built-in WiFi, a touchscreen, and Bluetooth.

 

On the other hand Nikon had just the Nikon Z6 – a powerful camera for experts, more advanced users, and pros. It has in-body stabilization, continuous shooting up to 12fps, full width oversampled 6K-to-4K video, and more.

Get the Canon if you are looking for an easy and cheap introduction to full frame mirrorless,. If you want more features then go for the Nikon Z5.

canon EOS cameraMid-range Mirrorless Cameras

In mid-range, tough competition between the Canon EOS M6 Mark II and Nikon Z50 is there.

Camera bodies of both offer an APS-C sensor, Bluetooth, an adjustable LCD screen, and WiFi connection, a touchscreen, and webcam function. But there are some features in which Z50 wins over the M6 Mark II.

It has a significant number i.e. 209 of focus points, and Canon has 143. It has twice as wide an ISO range, weatherproof sealing, and longer flash coverage.

An Image of the Nikon Z50 Top-end Mirrorless Cameras

There are different categories in the area of top mirrorless cameras.

The EOS RP leads the full-frame mirrorless cameras market. In the enthusiast department,  Canon R6 and Nikon Z6 have competition. The Z6 sensor, handling system, and price are better. On the other hand, Canon R6 provides better low-light management and video shooting opportunities.

In the market of the best mirrorless camera, we must mention Canon R5 and Nikon Z7 from these brands. From there, Canon has a prominently leading with better video and low light management system.

Nikon is leading in both of these categories with the release of Z7II and Z6 II.

canon cameras on map

A Real-World Comparison

Nikon and Canon both have their strongholds in different target markets. Here, we will go through the areas where the two brands differ from each other.

Lenses

Autofocus is the main and differencing point between the two brands. InCanon, all the EOS lenses have autofocus. On the other hand, Nikon AF-S lenses have autofocus only.

However, Nikon has their manual lenses, which are compatible with their DSLR cameras also and it is not applicable in Canon.

Professional methods for more accurate printed photographs

Do you want good printed photographs? Follow these steps for reliable print exposure and color.

Creating quality prints is a skill of its own in the professional world of photography. Producing good colors and accurately exposing your pictures in-camera, then post-processing them is useless effort if the final result does not match what you see on the screen. 

For printed photographs to process, we need to create the same color depth and a great balance of highlights and need to have a streamlined workflow from shoot to output. 

For photographers who are experienced in the field this is likely old news – even some failed attempts in printing or several disappointing returns from online print places will be learning in print management. However, there are few steps that should be taken to make sure even better continuity of tone and more accurate results. 

Lets look at some simple and effective color control fundamentals that, while obvious in hindsight, can be overlooked by many!

Familiar surroundings

Where your editing is as important as how you process your images there is no hidden thing that the editing of images should ideally be done in neutral settings, in a room with walls and no direct light falling on the screen. Whereas, continuity is critical – find a neutral place and edit all your images in that. Changing places, even within a room, can have effects on how you see the colors in your picture. 

Calibrate regularly

Monitoring calibration is an important point in producing reliable colors. But the regularity with which you do this is also needs to be kept in view. Many photographers calibrate their screen, then don’t do repeat that. This lets time for the monitor to shift again. So, calibrate as part of your regular work may be bi-weekly.

Monitor to camera

Have you ever thought of your computer monitor and comparing it to your camera screen? Not only there are differences in how they represent color but  camera screen likely only shows you a JPEG preview of your RAW files. Select a flat JPEG profile in-camera, then compare a reference image on both your camera LCD and editing screen, to identify discrepancies. This will help you capture more reliable colors in the field, minimizing how much later color adjustment is required, and reducing the likelihood of unwanted settings making it to print.

Compare prints to screen

If you have any reference prints, after employing some of the other steps featured, compare those to the final images on-screen. This will help you see where you have over-compensated or under-compensated for color or exposure issues. Shadows seem dark in print, so this process enables you to adjust your editing approach for that specific paper and printer combination. 

Adjust screen for setting

Sometimes you have to leave your common editing space. When this is unresistable, take note of the places or similar lighting conditions you find yourself working with– this can enable you to adjust the color balance of your system’s screen, to more precisely adjust for the change. The aim of this activity is to reproduce the screen appearance in your standard editing area, giving you more color consistency.

When you understand the balance between your perception of color in your images and how this translates through a printer, onto paper, you can make adjustments to edit your image. This helps gain more predictable colors and fewer wasted prints!

 

For more information or buying best cameras or camera accessories in Karachi please contact us.

Tips to Shoot Safari-Style Photos

Now that zoos and wildlife parks are open again, here are some tips to take photographs worthy of a safari.

Unlike safaris, where there’s no guarantee of seeing your favorite animals, wildlife parks offer assured access to these incredible creatures – but the drawback is that there’s a physical barrier between you and them. Though that’s no bad thing, considering these are predators that could consider a photographer to be a snack! 

By following these steps, you can take brilliant and natural-looking images that look like they could have been shot in the wild – but you’ll need to try to get closer access than a regular zoo can provide. 

01. Lens choice

We used a Canon EF 100-400mm telephoto-zoom – but as we got close to the animals, we could get away with a standard zoom too. Longer focal lengths and faster apertures enable you to achieve a shallower depth of field – all important for that ‘on safari’ look. 

02. Exposure and aperture

Shoot in aperture priority or manual and start with an aperture of around f/5.6. This will ensure that the animals’ facial features are sharp, with their bodies slowly falling out of focus – and distracting backgrounds, such as fences that give the game away, will be blurred.

03. Spot metering 

It’s crucial that the animal is properly exposed – set spot metering so that the exposure is weighted towards the selected focus point, which will be on the cat. The center-weighted metering mode would try to expose the entire scene, but the subject is more important.

04. ISO and shutter speed

The big cats we were shooting weren’t running around, so we didn’t need a super-fast shutter speed – just enough to avoid camera shake. Aim for at least ‘one over’ the longest focal length of the lens – so, 1/400 sec for a 400mm. Increase the ISO, if needed, to achieve this.

05. Continuous focusing

Set continuous autofocus mode to track the animals, combined with a low-speed continuous burst mode. You don’t need to be shooting at 10fps for these cats, so avoid high-speed continuous to avoid filling up the memory card. 

06. Pinpoint focus

Set a single AF point mode and position this at one side of the frame, so that there’s negative space for the cat to move into. Keep focus on the animal’s nearest eye so that it’s sharp as you follow it around. Zoom in and out to capture a variety of body shots and close-up portraits shoots.

07. Set-up: zoom in close

The combo of wide aperture, telephoto focal length and your focusing distance will mean your depth of field is so shallow that the bars on the cage will vanish. For the best results shoot as close to the fence as you possibly can, then be bold with your composition and fill the frame with these strong animals. As we discovered up close, male lion’s heads are huge – so it’s easy to get a tightly framed portrait even when shooting at 100mm.

08. Set-up: exposure compensation

Big cats come in all colors, from near-white lions to black jaguars, and spot metering will ensure that your camera biases its exposure to the subject. However, your metering system will still try to expose for a mid-tone, so you will have to dial in negative exposure compensation for cats with dark fur, and positive exposure compensation for animals with lighter fur (if shooting in manual mode, increase or decrease the ISO and/or shutter speeds).

09. Set-up: better backgrounds

Try lots of compositions, and try placing your subject to one side of the image and leaving space for it to look or ‘move’ into. Look to avoid man-made objects in the frame to maintain the natural ‘safari’ feel to your shots. If you can’t blur out the fence at the end of the pen, try composing with some more natural elements positioned behind the animal.

10. Set-up: capture behavior

Look to take dramatic photos that capture the big cats displaying emotion – and their impressive teeth! This can help show a powerful predator on the prowl, rather than a captive cat. These beasts love to climb up high, and this offers a great chance to zoom in with a super-telephoto to capture them against the sky. A good tip is to find out from your guide which cats are likely to show off, then be patient and sit ready with your lens raised and pre-focused on them; it may be a fleeting display, so shoot with a fast shutter speed.

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Photography business

How To Easily Set Your Photography Price List in 2021

Determining a feasible pricing structure is one of the most daunting tasks a new photography entrepreneur faces. There’s not a magic formula when deciding how much to charge for your work, but there are some helpful guidelines you can follow.

Pricing strategies

The proliferation of digital media has made it much harder for photographers to charge for prints in the traditional way. So rather than adopt a “nickel and dime” pricing strategy where you charge for each print of an image (or photo shoot, proofs, photo album, and/or prints), consider charging only for what clients really value — your ability to capture moments.

One way you can capitalize on that is by offering specials on your social media

accounts. For example, many family photographers offer “mini-sessions” themed to various holidays or times of year via their social media channels. Sign-up is available to social followers only, and the price is a set one — usually a basic sitting fee for a small package of photos.

A photographer’s estimate is usually based on two elements: creative fees and expenses. On the creative side, you need to think about the quality of the image and what value you place on it. Photographer Jerry Clement says his formula for gallery prints includes the cost of production and what he calls an “intrinsic, artistic value,” with some profit margin on top of that. “You also have to take into account the gallery’s commission,” Clement says, “which usually averages 30 to 40 percent.”

You might also want to charge a sitting fee when working with clients. The sitting fee should cover your time as the photographer, editing of images, and, if you offer one, an online gallery of the client’s photos they can share with family and friends.

As part of your fees, factor in labor, supplies, and materials. Will the images be shot on location or in a studio? If you’re operating a studio, take a long, hard look at your local competitors to see what they’re charging for similar services, then start your pricing somewhere in the middle.

Wedding, portrait, and event photographers have an easier time scoping out the competition because it’s easy to stop by and pick up a price list and other information from competitors or simply visit their respective websites. Although it’s simple enough to pick up the phone and call a commercial photographer about their fees, it’s highly unlikely you’ll get a standard rate because fees are usually developed on a project-by-project basis. To cover yourself, be sure to pad your fee a bit to include unexpected issues.

Location shoots are more complex and involve considerations like site logistics, travel, special equipment, lighting equipment, props and additional personnel (e.g., models, assistants, technicians). In addition to the complexity of the project, you also need to consider the number of finished images needed, scheduling and pre- and post-production time.

Pre-production responsibilities may include client meetings, site location and/or visits, and set arrangements. After the shoot is over, post-production tasks may consist of restoring a site to its original state, returning props and equipment, and more client meetings — along with image editing, selecting, and finalizing the images.

Many commercial or location photographers charge day or half-day rates, with fees adjusted to weekly for long-term shoots or hourly for shorter projects. Don’t forget to add overtime (hourly rate plus 50 percent) for days that go longer than eight hours or for weekend assignments.

Whenever in doubt, use the industry standards found through different photography associations and organizations, like American Society for Media Photographers (ASMP) or Professional Photographers of America (PPA). Local chapters have monthly meetings where members can network and learn a wealth of information, including local marketing and industry standards.

Expenses

The other part of the pricing equation is expenses. Many photographers — especially in the beginning — try to absorb minor expenses, like supplies, postage and basic camera gear. But these little things quickly add up and chip away at your profits. Your fee structure should cover these incidentals. For example, if you decide $50 is a fair hourly rate, charge $75. Then use the hourly charge to calculate daily and weekly rates.

Overhead should also be a calculated expense that includes rent, utilities, insurance, gas, mileage, and anything else that you’re not billing clients separately for. Big ticket expenses for individual assignments, like travel, equipment, or personnel, should be billed separately, depending on your — or the client’s — preferences.

And don’t forget to include your own salary in your cost of doing business — if you do, then you’ve made a grave business error. Pay yourself first, then consider the rest of your costs as overhead. Ultimately, if your business can’t cover its payroll and expenses, you’ll need to charge more for your work, find other ways to increase revenue and/or cut costs.

After factoring your costs into your pricing structure, find ways to reduce those costs and increase profits. Monitor your progress each month by using profit and loss reports, which your bookkeeping or accounting software should allow you to generate with ease if you’re using it correctly.

If you want to become successful and grow your business, you’re going to have to handle tasks you don’t like, including bookkeeping and accounting. Many photographers think of themselves as “creative types” who don’t deal with numbers. However, if you don’t understand the finances related to your business and maintain proper records using accounting or bookkeeping software, you’ll quickly find yourself in financial crisis.