Best Cameras In 2021

The best cameras have to do all sorts of jobs, from wedding, to high-resolution commercial photography of sports to video . The best cameras are some of the most hardy and reliable thing around – as mirrorless camera technology becomes more common. While mirrorless cameras can be tempting propositions, the best DSLRs can offer incredible shooting experiences, often incorporating mirrorless technology and features, such as on-sensor phase-detection autofocus and m

 Nikon D3500

Nikon D3500 is budget friendly, light, small and easy to use camera– all the qualities that beginners can be appealed also. It seems as if camera system is advancing at great speed right now, but this camera has all the qualities we look into for in a beginner’s camera, and we still haven’t found anything to touch it at this price.

Type: DSLR

Sensor: APS-C

Megapixels: 24.2MP

Lens mount: Nikon F (DX)

Screen: 3in, 921,000 dots

Max burst speed: 5fps

Max video resolution: 1080p (Full HD)

 User level: Beginner

Canon EOS 90D

This is the best Canon camera for enthusiasts that left few professional videographers and photographers taking a look too. It came with groundbreaking specifications that no other camera in this category can match at all.

Type: DSLR

Sensor: APS-C

Megapixels: 32.5MP

Lens mount: Canon EF-S

Screen: 3in vari-angle touchscreen, 1,040,000 dots

 Viewfinder: Pentaprism

Max burst speed: 10fps

Max video resolution: 4K UHD

User level: Enthusiast

Nikon D7500

Nikon followers looking for an all-round equivalent to the all purpose Canon EOS 90D should also take a look at the Nikon D7500. It offers a slightly faster 8fps continuous shooting speed, and a proven 51-point autofocus system with the ability to capture 4K video at once. This camera has a lower resolution (20MP vs 32.5MP) but in real-scenes shooting its high performance sensor delivers potos which are not far behind the results by the Canon, despite the difference in megapixels.

Type: DSLR

Sensor: APS-C

Megapixels: 20.9MP

Lens mount: Nikon DX

Screen: 3.2in tilting touchscreen, 922,000 dots

Viewfinder: Pentaprism

Max burst speed: 8fps

 Max video resolution: 4K

User level: Enthusiast

Nikon D780

Nikon D780 takes detection autofocus in the on-sensor phase of Nikon’s own mirrorless Z6 to offer a DSLR with mirrorless camera live view in fantastic performance! This camera is like a supercharged, modernised version of Nikon’s popular D750 model. Nikon D780 doesn’t just have advanced live view but it also comes with a high resolution tilting touchscreen, dual UHS-II compatible memory card slots , 4K UHD video, and continuous shooting speeds about 12fps in live view mode.

Type: DSLR

 Sensor: Full frame

Megapixels: 24.4MP

Lens mount: Nikon FX

Screen: 3.2in tilting screen, 2,359k dots

Viewfinder: Pentaprism

Max burst speed: 7/12fps

Max video resolution: 4K UHD

User level: Enthusiast/professional

Canon EOS 6D Mark II

We adore Nikon D780, but Canon EOS 6D Mark II has been in the market longer and has much impressive feature. The 26-megapixel sensor is more than enough, it also does have Canon’s Dual Pixel CMOS AF system, so the autofocus in live view is very speedy and effective.

Type: DSLR

Sensor: Full frame

Megapixels: 26.2MP

 Lens mount: Canon EF

Screen: 3.2in vari-angle touchscreen, 1,040,000 dots

Viewfinder: Pentaprism

 Max burst speed: 6.5fps

Max video resolution: 1080p (Full HD)

User level: Enthusiast

 Nikon D850

Nikon D850 is a costly camera but its features put it in a class of its own. It has 45.7MP resolution, and 153-point autofocus system. It can capture pictures at 7 frames per second – or 9fps with an optional MB-D18 battery power.

Type: DSLR

Sensor: Full frame

Megapixels: 45.7MP

 Lens mount: Nikon FX

Screen: 3.2in tilting touchscreen, 2,359,000 dots

Viewfinder: Pentaprism

 Max burst speed: 7fps

Max video resolution: 4K

User level: Enthusiast/professional

WRAP UP

Choosing the best professional camera is not just about picking the one with the most enticing specifications but you have to look at the camera as a whole, its model, its lenses, and what is set to be released in its future. Before choosing a system, it is worth asking yourself a lsit of questions: 

1) Are you switching from a different systems? If you are switching from a different system, it is worth looking well into whether there is any potential compatibility between your existing and new system. Existing system migration is much simpler and cheaper than starting with a whole new setup again.

2) What lenses will you need? Think about the typeof work you need and the lenses you reuqire for the purpose and check whether the system you are choosing can meet those requirements.

3) DSLR or mirrorless? It does sometimes feel like mirrorless is getting around the world, but the best DSLR cameras do still have their advantages, like the Canon EOS-1D X Mark III, are making new ground.

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